10 Logo Design Tips

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do thy research beforehand

This will always be one of the first things you’ll want to do and every designer has a different process but in some way or another, go through a creative brief with a client so that your design matches their values/goals/brand.

stand out

While you're doing your research, don’t forget to check out what your competition is doing. That way, you can see what the target market is used to and it can help give you ideas of what to avoid or what you can do to stand out.

keep it simple

A solid logo doesn’t get bogged down by too much detail - it is able to connect with it’s audience instantly and stay recognizable. This is what makes logo design difficult. To make it special while keeping it simple.

sketching

your first ideas are your worst ideas, so get them out on paper. This doesn’t have to be a work of art, but personally sketching out a couple of ideas leads to something I wouldn’t have thought of if I hopped right into Illustrator.

avoid using too many fonts

Along those lines, don’t use too many fonts - this goes for any project, stick with 2-3 different fonts or 1 font and multiple weights & styles.

oh yeah and don’t forget to learn about font personality

This is my favorite step of the project, because I just really love typography. For each typeface, I’ll research who created it, why, how they made it, etc.

beware of trends

Don’t get me wrong, I love good design trend - but save those for blog post graphics. If you get your logo and brand identity design wrapped up in trends you’ll end up looking like everyone else - not to mention get a little outdated.

composition & formatting

This is where it’s important to know your graphic design principles: pay attention to negative space, kerning and all that good stuff.

try it at all sizes

I always like to zoom in & zoom out a bunch to see if the logo holds its personality at various sizes: You never know where that logo could end up one day.

the importance of colors

I design first drafts in black and white so my clients and I don’t get distracted with color changes right out the gate. But once you’re ready to add color - do your research on color feelings and meanings and weird stuff like that.